FILM REVIEW | Wrath of Man

Cinema has some classic director-actor pairings.

You've got Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks. Martin Scorsese and Robert DeNiro. Ben Stiller and Owen Wilson. Ridley Scott and Russell Crowe. And Guy Ritchie and Jason Statham.

It's the latter that concerns us today, as Ritchie and Statham have reunited for Wrath of Man.

The chess-loving director and former Commonwealth Games diver first collaborated back in 1998's brilliant Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels.

They worked together twice more (Snatch and Revolver) and are now back for their fourth big screen effort, which is a remake of a French film.

Wrath of Man sees Statham's enigmatic character H secure a job with cash truck business Fortico, not too long after two guards were killed on the job.

It soon becomes clear, after H 'takes care' of an entire crew set on robbing his team's truck, that the new hire is far more qualified for this job than he let on, and is maybe also a psychopath.

In classic Ritchie style, the plot reveals itself through time jumps, with the audience learning information in a non-linear fashion.

Don't mess with H: Jason Statham stars as enigmatic lead character H in Guy Ritchie's latest crime caper Wrath of Man, rated MA15+, in cinemas now.

Don't mess with H: Jason Statham stars as enigmatic lead character H in Guy Ritchie's latest crime caper Wrath of Man, rated MA15+, in cinemas now.

Turns out H's son was killed by a crew targetting cash trucks, and he's on the hunt for the men responsible - that's where that 'wrath' of the title comes in.

While Wrath of Man isn't as snappy or funny as Ritchie's best films (or even his last, The Gentlemen) it's still a decent way to spend a couple of hours.

That said, it does seem a little longer than necessary, and some plot points could have been clearer.

Den of Thieves tackled the cash truck heist situation with far more success than Wrath of Man, but the violence and 'man on a mission' situation is still enjoyable.

There's also a pretty decent support cast, with appearances by Eddie Marsan (Atomic Blonde), Holy McCallany (Mindhunter), Josh Hartnett (Black Hawk Down), Jeffrey Donovan (Sicario), Andy Garcia (Ocean's 11) and a surprisingly sinister turn from Scott Eastwood (The Outpost).

While it has some of the hallmarks of a Ritchie film, Wrath of Man needed more humour (and more Britishness) to really be considered one of his best.

Rating: 6.5/10