Minto filmmaker hopes to make his new show mainstream

Gabriel Faatau'uu-Satiu has been selected, amongst 15 emerging filmmakers, to be mentored in an online workshop by US industry professionals.

Gabriel Faatau'uu-Satiu has been selected, amongst 15 emerging filmmakers, to be mentored in an online workshop by US industry professionals.

Gabriel Faatau'uu-Satiu might be new to Macarthur but he is no stranger to screenwriting.

The Minto resident is currently working on a project called Breaking Bread, whichis a drama/horror anthology series centred around a Samoan family.

Mr Faatau'uu-Satiu said the new webseries would start production in just two weeks.

"I wrote the series based around my own experience as a Samoan," he said.

"It tells stories through food because when I was young, stories were always shared around the dinner table.

"It's about a Samoan family who have had a curse put on them and how that plays out between the different generations of the family."

Each of the six episodes features Samoan themes such as traditional food, dance, healing and tattoos.

"We have a great cast and crew - some of them have worked professionally before but we also found some great talent through a casting call in western Sydney," he said.

"We are marketing it as a webseries right now but once we have the pilot done I want to try and get it on Netflix, Amazon, Stan, everywhere."

Outside of film-making Mr Faatau'uu-Satiu also teaches a creative writing workshop in partnership with the Campbelltown Council libraries

Mr Faatau'uu-Satiu has been selected, among 15 emerging filmmakers, to be mentored in an online workshop facilitated by the Information and Cultural Exchange (ICE).

The workshops will be held in partnership with Los Angeles-based company Film Independent.

Each participant will be mentored by US industry professionals to develop the skills required to take their projects to the next stage of development.

Mr Faatau'uu-Satiu said this was a huge opportunity for him.

"There is not a lot of opportunities for Pacific writers in television or movies - in fact there is almost zero representation," Mr Faatau'uu-Satiu said.

"This is a chance to work with experienced people on how to pitch a show because without a good pitch the show might never get picked up.

"At the end of the workshops we will be pitching our projects - hopefully using the skills we have learnt."

The passionate writer and producer said he had fallen in love with western Sydney since moving here 18 months ago.

"There are so many stories to tell in western Sydney - I think we are sitting on a gold mine," he said.

"Normally the west is shown in such a negative light but there is so much to love out here."

Mr Faatau'uu-Satiu said telling Pacific people's stories was important to him.

"Taika Waititi said in his speech when he won his Oscar that Pacific Islanders and ndigenous people's are the original storytellers," he said.

"Now with the pandemic and the Black Lives Matter movement there is no better time to start telling our stories.

"Now is the time to be brown and be proud of that."

This story Minto filmmaker hopes to make his new show mainstream first appeared on Campbelltown-Macarthur Advertiser.