Campbelltown Hospital opens coronavirus clinic

Get tested: A COVID-19 testing clinic has been set up at Campbelltown Hospital to test locals who may have the virus. Picture: Simon Bennett
Get tested: A COVID-19 testing clinic has been set up at Campbelltown Hospital to test locals who may have the virus. Picture: Simon Bennett

Macarthur residents who fear they may have contracted the coronavirus can be tested at Campbelltown Hospital's dedicated clinic.

The clinic is located inside a demountable building situated on Parkside Crescent between the public and private hospitals.

There have been no reported cases of coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, in Macarthur since the outbreak earlier this year.

A Campbelltown Hospital spokeswoman said the clinic was set up to give residents access to testing in a convenient environment.

"The specialty clinic for COVID-19 at Campbelltown Hospital on Therry Road is open from 10am to 5.30pm, Monday to Friday," she said.

"The purpose of these clinics is for people who have respiratory symptoms or fever and who are at risk of COVID-19, for example because they were in contact with a COVID-19 case, or have returned from overseas in the 14 days before onset of symptoms."

Macarthur residents have felt the wider effects of the virus despite no cases being reported in the region.

Supermarket shelves are often empty of toilet paper, pasta and flour with many locals taking to social media community groups to vent their frustrations.

Macarthur MP Dr Mike Freelander said the coronavirus had become "the most critical situation that had been faced by public health institutions" in more than 40 years.

"But I believe that we can cope with this if we put the right systems in place, particularly by slowing the spread of the virus," he said.

"This requires national action and a national policy run by scientists. Australia has the best healthcare system in the world and I believe we will get through this with national leadership to control the spread, and if we all do the right things."

Dr Freelander urged concerned locals who had any questions about the virus to phone or email his office.

"Coronavirus cases in Australia are increasing and it very unlikely that we will prevent further spread," he said.

"There has been inconsistent advice from state and federal authorities, which is not surprising, given that this is an evolving situation and there is much about COVID-19 that we don't know.

"If we can control the rapidity of the spread of the virus then I have no doubt that our medical systems will cope with the crisis."

Residents who believe they may have contracted the virus are urged to seek medical advice.