FILM REVIEW: Black Christmas

This is a holiday move you don't want to watch with the whole family.

The latest film from prolific horror production company Blumhouse (think The Conjuring, Get Out, Happy Death Day, etc) is Black Christmas, a remake of the 1974 Canadian slasher.

There's nothing much festive about this flick though - it's all about murder, sexual assault and institutionalised misogyny.

Like the original, Black Christmas follows a group of college sorority sisters at the start of Christmas break, where their campus is a little less bustling than usual.

The women are gearing up to host a Christmas dinner for anyone still on campus during the holiday break.

But they are also in open warfare with a neighbouring fraternity - the same fraternity that the college's notoriously bigoted founder attended.

Better watch out: Imogen Poots' character Riley hides from from a masked intruder with a bow and arrow in new feminist horror remake Black Christmas, rated M, in cinemas now.

Better watch out: Imogen Poots' character Riley hides from from a masked intruder with a bow and arrow in new feminist horror remake Black Christmas, rated M, in cinemas now.

Black Christmas is a decidedly feminist take on a genre that has often viewed women - especially young women who enjoy things like alcohol and sex - as expendable.

The women in this film call out misogyny and the very real campus rape culture, drawing the ire of 'humiliated' young men. The core four characters are a united front, despite their differing opinions on how to topple the patriarchy, coming to each other's aid and working together to survive the masked killer hellbent on picking them off one by one.

The actual scares in Black Christmas are not that great - there's not a lot of tension (aside from one very cool static shot that sees a sorority sister bustling through the house looking for a cat when it's obvious that a killer is ready to murder her at any moment), the photography is dark and a little grimy and the reason the women are being hunted is supernatural, which is a let down.

But the acting is pretty decent, especially from Imogen Poots (That Awkward Moment) who plays protagonist Riley. She perfectly embodies the frustration, anger and despair or a woman who is sick of not being believed and having her very valid concerns ignored.

While Black Christmas might not be the best horror movie you've ever seen, it's worth it for the strong feminist elements.

But if you're looking to switch of your brain, maybe pick another flick.

Rating: 5.5/10