Harry Hartogs Narellan celebrates 'Love your Bookshop Day' in style

Love Your Bookshop Day encouraged readers across Australia to visit their local book store and celebrate what makes them great.
Photo: Eden Samuel

Love Your Bookshop Day encouraged readers across Australia to visit their local book store and celebrate what makes them great. Photo: Eden Samuel

Harry Hartogs Narellan invited locals to celebrate Love Your Bookshop Day last Sunday, with a range of fun events on offer for readers of all ages.

Love Your Bookshop Day is an Australian Booksellers Association initiative encouraging people to celebrate the special role that books and book-selling play in supporting communities and creativity.

Readers across Australia were invited to visit their local bookshop, with an events program that no bibliophile could resist.

Book stores nation-wide welcomed the opportunity to showcase their carefully curated collection and passion for literature, with Harry Hartogs Narellan Store Manager, Stephanie Parkin, saying the event reminded people of the importance of physical book stores.

"Today we celebrate why book stores are always relevant and important, not a dying breed as so many people would have you believe," she said.

"It's an amazing day we get to spend with people in the community, welcoming them into the space we have created for book-lovers."

Harry Hartogs Narellan Store Manager, Stephanie Parkin, welcomed the opportunity to celebrate why bookstores are important with the local community. Photo: Eden Samuel

Harry Hartogs Narellan Store Manager, Stephanie Parkin, welcomed the opportunity to celebrate why bookstores are important with the local community. Photo: Eden Samuel

From free poetry and author read-ins, to a massive rare books prize valued at $1700, Harry Hartogs Narellan gave visitors questioning the appeal of physical bookstores every reason to opt for the in-store experience, with local English teacher and mother, Teresa, saying as long as there is encouragement, physical books won't lose their appeal with young readers.

"We're not going to lie, our daughter watches TV and goes on the iPad but we always balance out her screen time with reading physical books," Teresa said.

"She's getting into classic fairy tales now and we buy all those memorable books from here, even though they are available online."

With donations from in-store events, such as the face-painting station, going towards the Indigenous Literacy Foundation, Ms Parkins hopes that the Love Your Bookshop event can break down barriers and provide a safe space for readers young and old to explore their imagination.

"It's so important to keep encouraging people to enter the world of the imagination and to help them explore that realm through literature," she said.

"The shared experience of reading the same story and the tangible element of actually holding a book are things that cannot be replaced."

Local writer, Courtney Phillips, dedicated proceeds from her Free Poetry stand to the Indigenous Literacy Foundation. Photo: Eden Samuel

Local writer, Courtney Phillips, dedicated proceeds from her Free Poetry stand to the Indigenous Literacy Foundation. Photo: Eden Samuel