Pheasants Nest poultry farm approved

New farm: A large-scale poultry farm will be built in Pheasants Nest despite concerns raised by neighbouring residents.
New farm: A large-scale poultry farm will be built in Pheasants Nest despite concerns raised by neighbouring residents.

A poultry farm housing 315,000 chickens has been given the green light in Pheasants Nest.

The development application for the large chicken farm on Mockingbird Road was presented to the Wollondilly Local Planning Panel last month.

The panel decided to approve the development despite concerns raised by residents.

Pheasants Nest resident Pam Newton was disappointed by the plans for the farm.

"I urged the council to refuse this development proposal based on the global evidence that intensive animal agriculture is extremely harmful to animals, our environment and people," she said.

"Chickens are the most abused and exploited farm animals around the world.

"No amount of council consent conditions will ever adequately protect the animals involved, our environment or people including the local community and those employed in these intensive sheds.

"Once approved, this cannot be undone and the risks and impacts begin from the outset."

Plans for the $6.5 million project include seven poultry sheds housing 45,000 chickens each, a machinery shed, a litter shed, a composting shed, a workers amenity building, two earth dams and associated infrastructure.

The 16-hectare property is currently used for market gardening.

Chickens are the most abused and exploited farm animals around the world.

Pam Newton

Residents said noise, smell and waste management were some of their biggest issues with the poultry farm.

People also raised concerns with traffic management stating that the roads were not suitable for numerous truck movements.

Some nearby farmers raised concerns about biosecurity threats to their animals.

However a NSW Department of Primary Industries spokesman said the concerns were unfounded.

"We cannot assert that the proposed development would empirically increase a biosecurity risk to the existing breeder farms," he said.

The panel approved the development as it complied with the rural guidelines for use of the site.

The panel said the concerns raised by residents were adequately addressed in the report and the proposal was compliant with state and council planning policies.