Long delay: where are Appin Road's line markings?

Half a job: Five weeks after Appin Road was resurfaced, motorists using the road are still waiting for RMS staff to provide line markings.

Half a job: Five weeks after Appin Road was resurfaced, motorists using the road are still waiting for RMS staff to provide line markings.

Motorists have been forced to navigate one of the region's most dangerous roads without line markings for the past five weeks.

The Roads and Maritime Services undertook essential maintenance work on Appin Road in early April, periodically closing the stretch between Appin township and the M1 Princes Motorway over a three-day period while work was carried out.

Essential re-surfacing work was completed but the all-essential line marking was not.

Roadwork signs still greet 10,000 daily motorists on a particularly bendy stretch of the notorious road.

Macarthur MP Dr Mike Freelander, who travels the stretch daily, last week questioned whether the Roads and Maritime Services were taking safety on the road seriously.

He said the speed through the resurfaced section remained at 90km/h and was navigated frequently by trucks travelling to and from nearby mines.

The section in question also has a merge between two southbound lanes and is difficult to navigate during poor weather conditions.

Dr Freelander said the failure to provide line markings demonstrated a lack of understanding for how dangerous the road could be.

"It also demonstrates how poor the state and federal government management has been of the money allocated to improve it," Dr Freelander said.

"It's wasted on dribs and drabs without a commitment to fully fix the road.

"It's just a matter of time before something tragic happens again."

Dr Freelander said a Shorten Labor government, if elected on Saturday, would spend $50 million on safety upgrades to the road, along with $5 million for a wildlife bridge.

A Roads and Maritime Services spokesman said the line marking delay had occurred because of "issues with scheduling and availability of work crews" and was scheduled to occur sometime this week.

More than 20 people have been killed in accidents on the road since the year 2000.

Wollondilly mayor Mathew Deeth said his council wanted the Roads and Maritime Services "to lift its socks".

"We have been calling on the state government and the RMS to come to the table and solve the issue of Appin Road because frankly it's not good enough," he said.

"Appin Road is one of the most unsafe roads in the region, we need all parties and key stakeholders to come together and solve the issue."