2018 Hidden Treasures Honour Roll includes three Wollondilly women

TOP VOLUNTEERS: Wollondilly women Sharon Bishop (left), Sharon Robertson and Marion Palmer. Pictures: Simon Bennett and Marion Palmer
TOP VOLUNTEERS: Wollondilly women Sharon Bishop (left), Sharon Robertson and Marion Palmer. Pictures: Simon Bennett and Marion Palmer

"I'm quite surprised, you don't do volunteer work to get awards.”

That’s the view of Picton’s Sharon Bishop who is one of three Wollondilly women to be recognised for their service to the community.

Ms Bishop, The Oaks resident Sharon Robertson and Bargo’s Marion Palmer were recently named on this year’s Hidden Treasures Honour Roll.

The annual NSW Department of Primary Industries initiative acknowledges rural women who go above and beyond when volunteering.

More than 80 women across the state were named on the 2018 list.

Ms Bishop was recognised for her service to several community groups, including the Lions Club of Tahmoor.

She has also volunteered for CareFlight and assists with the Dilly Drought Drive drought relief appeal.

Ms Bishop has been involved with Lions for more than 20 years and is a past club president.

“The Lions motto is ‘we serve’ and I think it says it all – we’re all about the community,” Ms Bishop said.

“We’ve been here in Wollondilly for 35 years and it’s a good community that stands by everyone.”

Ms Robertson founded the Dilly Drought Drive in February and has been a driving force behind the appeal.

She also founded the Light Up The Oaks Christmas Night in 2005 and has helped run other community events such as the Time Travellers World Fair at Menangle.

Ms Robertson said she was shocked to be named on the Hidden Treasures Honour Roll.

“It’s very humbling and embarrassing – you don’t do this [work] for the limelight,” she said.

Ms Robertson moved to The Oaks 18 years ago and said she loved the Wollondilly community.

“There are so many people out here who want to help each other,” she said.

Ms Palmer has been a mainstay at the Wollondilly WIRES branch for more than two decades.

The long-time Bargo resident said she was “humbled” to be recognised for her volunteer work.

“It’s surprising, I’m sure there are people out there more deserving than me,” she said.

Ms Palmer said she joined WIRES 26 years ago because she always loved animals.

She is now the Wollondilly branch animal co-ordinator and said it was important for people to assist wildlife when necessary.

Ms Palmer said her “ongoing love of animals” kept her motivated to continue her work at WIRES.

“Native animals have had such a tough time with things like the drought,” she said.

“People need to step in and do a job for them.”