Campbelltown Catholic Club buys historic Fisher’s Ghost restaurant

LANDMARK: Campbelltown Catholic Club will be investigating the best ways to preserve this historic building...if it can.
LANDMARK: Campbelltown Catholic Club will be investigating the best ways to preserve this historic building...if it can.

Campbelltown Catholic Club has been revealed as the mystery buyer of the old Fisher’s Ghost Restaurant on Queen Street.

That news has delighted Campbelltown Council and local historians.

Mayor George Brticevic said the Catholic Club’s strong track record – such as the painstaking restoration of the 1840 Quondong building – meant it was an “ideal” purchaser.

Kay Hayes, president of Campbelltown and Airds Historical Society, called the news “brilliant”.

“We’re so pleased this site has been purchased by an organisation known to support local heritage and history,” Mrs Hayes said.

A ruin since fire tore through the structure in 2005, the building is one of Campbelltown’s most historically significant sites.

It was originally the first local steam mill – where the industrial revolution arrived in Campbelltown – then became a busy maternity hospital. Its fate has long stirred controversy as developers have attempted to bulldoze the building and erect a tower block on the site.

Now the Catholic Club hopes to treat it with respect.

Club president David Olsson announced the purchase of the site at a packed function at The Cube on Sunday.

He said it was too early for any solid plans.

“The first thing we’ll do is get some architects in there to have a look at the old mill site, just to see what the situation is after the fire,” Mr Olsson said.

“Our priority at this point is simply to secure the site.

“I can say that Campbelltown Council is very happy that we’ve bought the site, and everyone I’ve spoken with so far seems ecstatic.”

Catholic Club chief executive Michael Lavorato also pointed to the club’s widely-praised restoration of Quondong, now the local visitor information centre.

“Our purchase obviously comes with some responsibilities regarding the heritage part of the property, but we've got a great record of treating those sort of things with respect and integrity,” he said.

“I look forward to identifying with the club board a great use for the property for years to come.”

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