Appin couple plan to tie the knot in Australia following historic day

Cause for celebration: Kristy and Rachelle Millers will likely tie the knot in Australia towards the end of next year. Picture: Simon Bennett
Cause for celebration: Kristy and Rachelle Millers will likely tie the knot in Australia towards the end of next year. Picture: Simon Bennett

November 4, 2018.

It’s a date that family and friends of Kristy and Rachelle Millers now have firmly marked in the diary.

Yesterday’s historic decision to legalise same-sex marriage has been a long time coming for the Appin couple.

The Millers were married in Thailand on November 4, 2011, but their nuptials were never legally recognised in Australia.

However, the couple now plan to have an Australian wedding sevens years to the date after their Thaliand wedding.

“We said to our friends and family if this (legislation) passes, save the date next year,” Kristy said.

“I can’t wait to celebrate in Australia. The only disappointment is my (late) grandparents won’t be there to see it. They were the biggest advocates for my relationship with Rachelle.”

Kristy said she had tears in her eyes when Australia become the 26th country to legalise same-sex marriage.

While she was relieved with the result, she couldn’t help but think ‘what if this decision had been made earlier?’.

“In my life I’ve had five close friends commit suicide,” she said.

“Four out of the five identified as gay or doubted their sexuality. I wonder what this decision would have made to their state of mind if they felt more accepted.”

The couple celebrated the historic milestone last night with a low key dinner with their two children, Nixon and Zahli.

When the Bill “finally” passed through Parliament, local lawyer and marriage equality advocate Brett McGrath said he felt “relieved”.

“I was watching it on TV and when it finally happened I got goosebumps,” the former St Gregorys College student said.

“The scenes in parliament were unprecedented, I’ve never seen such joy coming from the public gallery.”

Mr McGrath said the result was exactly what the country needed after a “tumultuous” year.

The president of the Macarthur Law Society was also on a panel which reviewed the legislation before it was adopted by parliament.

He said he was pleased with the Bill that went through.

“The panel and I were satisfied with the legislation that passed through parliament,” he said.

“Importantly it protects religious freedoms and allows a 90-day period for civil celebrants to register as religious ministers.”

Mr McGrath said the world was deflated after Donald Trump’s election as the US president in 2016 and this marriage equality decision was just what the doctor ordered.

“It’s truly the best way to end 2017,” he said.

“Love has won in the end.”