Past dux shares his HSC survival tips

Michael Abrahamian (second from the right), Kaeli McAlistar, Brooke Lockwood and Hannah Matthews achieved excellent HSC results at Picton High School last year.

Michael Abrahamian (second from the right), Kaeli McAlistar, Brooke Lockwood and Hannah Matthews achieved excellent HSC results at Picton High School last year.

The Higher School Certificate is the culmination of a 13-year schooling journey for hundreds of Year 12 Macarthur students.

It is also their most stressful year.

Students put pressure on themselves to achieve outstanding results as do parents and teachers.

But take it from last year’s Picton High School dux – “results are not as important as you think”.

Michael Abrahamian topped the school with an Australian Tertiary Admission Rank result of 95.10.

Undoubtedly an outstanding result but in order to achieve the high mark, Mr Abrahamian said balance and planning was the key to surviving the HSC.

“Planning out my study schedule ensured I had enough time to revise all of my subjects,” he said.

“I also made sure I took a break to relax each night to watch television or a movie.

“Students can also study with friends because it can help to explain the content to others. Just make sure you don’t spend too much time socialising.”

Mr Abrahamian said students should also look after themselves during the exam period.

“Students should continue to exercise and eat properly because it will help you study better,” he said.

Mr Abrahamian is now studying a Bachelor of Information, Communication and Technology (Advanced) at Western Sydney University’s Campbelltown campus.

His advice to this year’s cohort was “take each exam one at a time”.

“Don’t spend time worrying about how you went in your exam because there isn’t anything you can do about it,” he said.

“Take a quick break and start studying for the next one.”

Mr Abrahamian said his most important study resource was past papers.

“If Year 12 students study hard for their trial exams then they won’t have to cram for their HSC exams,” he said.

“Practise getting into a routine of studying.”

Mr Abrahamian said parents needed to not put too much pressure on their son or daughter during the HSC.

“Parents can give advice but at the end of the day it is up to the student to decide how much time they want to spend studying,” he said.

“Some parents can go overboard with worry and they can build up the importance of the exams too much.

“Parents should take a step back and talk to their son or daughter to make sure they aren’t feeling overwhelmed.”

The HSC exams begin on Monday, October 16.

For more information, visit: www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/hsc

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop