Boxer turns attention to talented youth after final fight

Developing young talent: Peter Brennan is training some of the next generation's talented boxers and kick boxers in the region. Picture: Chris Lane

Developing young talent: Peter Brennan is training some of the next generation's talented boxers and kick boxers in the region. Picture: Chris Lane

Peter Brennan has fallen just short of becoming Macarthur’s latest title winning boxer.

The 36-year-old Camden South resident stepped inside the ring against Mathew Davoren on earlier this month, with the hope of coming away with the vacant title.

Brennan was confident heading into the bout and had to withhold an enthusiastic Davoren.

“He came out like a rocket,” Brennan said.

“We traded shots and I got stopped just before the end of the fifth round.

“It was a tough fight – I’m still feeling it.

“The swelling has gone down but I’ve still got a couple of black eyes and I’ve got ulcers in my mouth from getting cut up.”

Critics of the sport are often quick to point out the brutal nature of boxing.

But for the sport’s purists, the bout and the aftermath of the fight are only a small part of the sport, with a greater emphasis on training and discipline.

For Brennan, a former Thomas Reddall High School student who also trains young boxers at Ingleburn’s Bulldog Gym, boxing and kick boxing was all about the competition and pushing himself as an individual.

“I like to compete (in a sport) where if you stuff up it’s your own problem,” he said.

“There’s no one else there to help you like there is in a game of football.

“There’s a ring and you can’t run out of it.

“It’s not just about getting in there and swinging punches – it’s technical.

“I liken it to chess. You’re not thinking about your move now, you’re thinking about your next move or two and about what the other guy will do.”

Brennan said the latest fight was his last and he would solely focus on developing the next batch of boxers and kick boxers in the region.

“There is a satisfaction you get from seeing someone start from nothing,” he said.

“They go from not being able to throw a punch and being overweight to actually being able to throw a punch and losing that weight.

“Seeing the change in people is what I like.”

The gym has also run classes for young people with autism and Brennan encouraged parents to bring their kids down to experience what the gym had to offer.

Those interested in the classes can visit bulldogmmagym.com for more information.

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